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there was three of us. now sometimes children you don't think of dr. martin luther king jr. as a child but he was really a child and grew up just like you, and so that's why i wanted to write this book. the book is entitled" my brother martin." it has lots of illustrations in it. i hope that you will have a chance to get to see the book more closely. ok. so this is part of it. a sister remembers. the sister, of course, is me. ok. the book starts out -- i will arche some words that martine some more of the martin said and the march i have a dream that one day little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with the little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers. i have a dream today. that's what he said in washington, d.c. at the lincoln memorial. ok. the book starts out and it has a picture of me. now when i wrote this book, i envisioned that i would be reading to children just like you, and the reason i thought of that is because my grandmother and my aunt lived in the home with us and many times they would baby-sit for my mother and father and they would sit and read
martin hraoutor king jr.? -- luther king jr.? all right. ok. do you realize he was a little boy one time just like you? ok. you knew him i'm sure as an adult. so this morning or early afternoon, i'm going to read to you from the book that i wrote about him. he was my brother and we had one other brother so there was three of us. now sometimes children you don't think of dr. martin luther king jr. as a child but he was really a child and grew up just like you, and so that's why i wanted to write this book. the book is entitled" my brother martin." it has lots of illustrations in it. i hope that you will have a chance to get to see the book more closely. ok. so this is part of it. a sister remembers. the sister, of course, is me. ok. the book starts out -- i will quote some words that martin said on the march on washington. i have a dream that one day little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with the little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers. i have a dream today. that's what he said in washington, d.c. at the lincoln memorial. ok. the book starts out an
>>> book tv continues with mr. kotz on martin luther king, jr.. this is about an hour. [applause] >>> good evening. it's a pleasure to be with you all. just two days shy of martin luther king's birthday, to talk about some things that took place in the 1960's that literally changed the history of this country. i am hoping to call on you all to participate in this talk about not only why those things happen in the 60's, but to talk about where do we go from here in a society that has despite great accomplishment has not fulfilled the passion and the dreams of lyndon johnson and martin luther king in a more just society. but i must tell you what we are sitting in today and the interactive exhibits are out of the hallways and the public walls of the national archives are a totally new phenomenon. .. he has been riding the horse since the day he got here, and thanks to karlin's leadership. thanks to marvin pinkert, he calls the genius behind the development of the new space. all of us as citizens can far better experience our history, and as a journalist, as a historian, and as a cit
of martin luther king's birthday, to talk about things that took place in9 the 1960s. there's literally changed the history of this country.. i'm h oping to call on you all o participate in this to talk about hy those things happened in the 1960's but to talk about where do we go from here in a society that has, despite great accomplishment, has not fulfilled the passion and the dreams of lyndon johnson and martin luther king for a more just society. but i must tell you that what we are sitting in today and the interactive exhibits around the hallways and the public vaults of the national archives are a totally new phenomenon. i remember as a kid and when my son jack was a kid you walked into this austere building and you stood in a line and you saw the constitution and the declaration and maybe another couple of things, and you marched back out. lyndon johnson had an expression which he used often and usually shrewdly where he would say that someone was all hat and no horse. i have learned in the case of kansas farmer who became a governor and is now our archivist he has been riding a
luther king that non-violence was dead, it was rejected. martin luther king couldn't defeat, and the story really was that the kennedy administration wanted carl sanders to win in 1962 and there was a federal injunction that was placed on martin luther king. so we went up against laureate pritchard in georgia. we had to take on the federal government coming and we chose not to do that and jack always seemed to understand that we were not the problem. fi joost call "the new york times" quite a bit because they were -- well i think that they were being polluted by information that they were getting distorted information they were getting from hoover and they would come to talk to us like we were the ones that create all these problems in the south. jack never did that. he understood where the problem was, and he knew -- i always thought of him as a friend and anything that he ever asked me i knew that i could answer him candidly and truthfully and there would be no downside to it and there were quite a few. those days were rough on reporters. in 1964 in mississippi but bbc rep
you very much. >> thank you. >> now the daughter of civil rights leaders martin luther king jr. and st. john's scott king desert rose in the life and legacy of coretta space king. she talks with books of america the publishers' trade show. this is about half an hour. >> bernice, who was scott bagley? >> well the sister of coretta scott king. >> and your mother. >> yes, my mother, so my aunt. he and my mother grew up in alabama together obviously and she later became a john notte professor. she founded the university in pennsylvania. so, a very lively woman. and unfortunately passed last year in june after completing the book. >> so this book is desert rose, the life and legacy of coretta scott king and the author is your aunt. when did she write this book? >> welcome it was a journey that began with my mother's request to write her story. at that time both of my parents were constantly being threatened she was confirmed she wouldn't be lost and wanted people to know she wasn't just the life of martin luther king jr. and mother of children but the role in the movement and very much an a
when did you first get to be interested in martin luther king? >> guest: when i was in high school as a young fellow growing up in atlanta georgia my parents didn't have an answer. it became kind of a quest to find out about it in the sense that there was enormous power and that would change the direction of my life. when i wasn't looking for it to happen. c-span: how many of your years did you think about this? >> guest: i started after i got into a book career in the late 70's after magazine journalism. i wanted to write about this period because i hadn't answered the question what is it made of and i thought in 1981 with what was proposed to be a three year history of the teen years and it's now been 16 years and i've done it in two volumes is now projected to be a trilogy or will be a trilogy after i finish it but i would have 20 years. definitely turning into my life work but i'm thankful for the privilege of it. c-span: the first book, parting the waters, 1,056 pages. this but there are 546 pages. what's been your approach? >> guest: to do it in storytelling. one of the reaso
the day i spent alone with martin luther king in madrid of all places, and the other one is about one of the really terrible events of the cold war which is when the united states ended up dropping four hydrogen bombs on spain. luckily, unarmed, and not on purpose, and i'll tell you that story later. two very different stories. the king's story is a soft story, and the bomb story is a hard story. before i do that, i thought i'd tell you about a few of the other chapters in the book, and, by the way, i brought along a bunch of copies, and if any of you want one, i'll write anything you'd like in there because i'm always looking for readers. that's why you write books. this is my 13th book. i write fiction, nonfiction, journalism, i go back and forth. i never wanted to make up my mind who i wanted to be when i grew up, and i never have so i go back and forth between this and literary forms. one of the chapters -- a couple chapters in the book i thought i might mention, and then i will get on to the king story. one of the chapters is about the making of a movie. my son, who was then four
a couple questions? >> originally the conception of the book is reading about martin luther and how he wrote his manifesto and it basically challenged the catholic church and originally that was the thought of the book, but of course nobody wants to hear a black eye right about martin luther in the 1600s, so it morphed into just a look at how comedically i've been in every part of this country and i don't think there's a state i haven't been to. i think i've noticed a palpable change in not only just as a culture, but even interacting interpol truly, the thing we expect as i remember when i was growing up, and others to save the world doesn't go you anything and now we have children who believe they are entitled. i think we all feel like that to a greater or lesser degree. vicious not the place we grew up regardless of the challenges we all face. i think there's a certain sense of pride. like my father swept plains and worked at a steel mill, but he was proud to do this job and he's still that man. i hope to instill that in my children. but we come from a nation of people who came from
very much. >> now bernice king the daughter of civil rights leader martin luther king jr. and coretta scott king discusses the recently published biography of her mother. desert rose the life and legacy of coretta scott king. she talked with booktv at bookexpo america publishing's annual trade show. this is about half an hour. >> bernice king who is edith scott dagley? >> guest: at edith scott bickley -- coretta scott king was the wife of martin luther king jr. -- cohost land your mother. >> guest: yes my mother so she was my aunt. she and my mother grew up in alabama together and she later became a drama professor. in fact she founded the drama department at the state university. she was a very lively woman and unfortunately passed last year in june. after completing this book. >> this book is desert rose the life and legacy of coretta scott king and the author is your aunt eva scott dagley? when did she write this book lacks. >> guest: well it was a journey that began with my mother's requested 1966 to write her story. at that time both of my parents were constantly being threaten
alone with martin luther king in madrid of all places and the other one is about one of the really terrible servients of th cold war which is when the united states drops four hydrogen bombs on omatiain, lucy unarmed and not on purpose and i will tell you that story, two different stories. before i do that i thought i would tell you about a few other chapters in the book and by the way i brought along a lot of copies, i will write servieryth you write in their. because i'm always looking for readers. that is why you write books. this is my fifteenth book. i write fiction, non-fiction, journalism, i go back and forth. i nservier wanted to make up my mind who wanted to be when i grow up and never have so i go back and forth between this and literary forms. one of the chapterby a couple chapters in the book i might mention and get on to the martin luther king story, one of the chapters is about making the movie doctors of auto, dr. zhit zhivago though marjorie fears his father ran geraldine chaplin his mother and their the picture in the book in the spanish edition and the american po
march on washington, a prominent historian and editor of martin luther king jr.'s papers, part of three days of booktv this weekend, monday, featuring authors and books on the inauguration, president obama and martin luther king jr.. >> last week booktv attended the key west literary seminar in florida. today from noon to 3:00 eastern we bring several of their talks and panels from the event. paul hendrickson, robert richardson, jeff gawker, and many more present and discuss their books. next, cynthia helms, widow of richard helms, recounts her life. she drug in england and served in world war ii, calls for introduction to the world of secret intelligence via her husband, the internal politics of the cia and the couple's time spent in tehran as richard helms served as american ambassador prior to the iranian revolution. this is about an hour. [applause] [applause] >> thank you. very kind of you, nice event you allowed us to have here. i am most grateful to you and i thank you for coming. cynthia is quite right. five years -- if you knew richard helms you didn't dare argue what was in th
dream. martin stream. the legacy of martin luther king jr. of the booktv.org for more on this weekend's television schedule. the director of food and water watch argues that our businesses such as kraft and tyson have hurt farmers and marginalize the help of crops and limited can affect agriculture industries hold. next on booktv. >> thank you so much for coming this evening. i am very excited to be here. i just got off the book to her this week. i have thinking about writing a book for a long time. but "foodopoly" is really what's making people so sick. we run into the companies that are dictating the policy in this country. when you ask most people why so many children drink twice as many photos as they did in 1970, or why 35% of adults are obese and 17% of children are obese? most people say it is kind of well, if the subsidies. people don't really know what is causing the problem with our food system. what really set me off to write "foodopoly" was a couple of events that happened in a weekend in 2011. i was traveling to a conference in the midwest as part of my j
and editor of martin luther king jr.'s papers, part of three days of booktv this weekend, monday featuring authors and books on the inauguration, president obama and martin luther king jr.. >> last week booktv attended the key west literary seminar in florida. today from noon to 3:00 eastern we bring several of her talks and panels from the event. paul hendrickson, robert richardson, and many more present and discuss their books. >> fred. this is the white house correspondent and author of the right frequency:the story of the talk radio giants who shook up the political and media establishment. what a talk radio giants we are talking about? >> today you have rush limbaugh, glen beck but this goes to the very beginning, walter winchell, it shows the trajectory of how talk radio began, the beginning of radio. i use this as a history of the united states since 1920 through the lens of talk radio. >> going all the way back what year are we talking about? >> we are talking about a 20s. the dean of commentators, the first guy i talked about in here, walter when shall -- walter windchill with a h
authors and books on the inauguration. president obama and martin luther king jr. >> have been trying to find a new lens, a new way of studying presidential character. about 12 years ago i wrote a book on the first lady's. the body of knowledge on lincoln pretty much everything that could be written probably has been. the greatest historian says been years poring through the letters and the evidence to produce this book on lincoln of this book and the hundreds of books on washington. so my problem is, why not look at the person that new them the best, the first lady because historians have largely ignored the role of the first lady as the largely ignored the mistresses and shipping the man. tend to be older man, educated in a certain way. most historians, as i always say, were not educated in matters of the heart. studying the first lady, the first thing thomas jefferson did after spending 17 days cooped up in of lost outside a philadelphia writing the declaration of independence, the first thing he did is he went shopping for market, his wife. he mr. she was pregnant. she had had a m
of ghandi and martin luther king, and he's even black, but nobody cares or who who he is. they are on opposite sides of the great divide. he's someone who ought to win the nobel peace prize. give it to the ladies in white. these people who began, they were wives and sisters and daughters and so on of political prisoners caught up in the sowled black spring. a wonderful group. they are beaten and beaten severely for what they do. they hold candle light vigils and the like, and the state just can't stand it and it makes things very difficult for them. let me quote armando, used to be known, still known by some of us as the cuban writing a once famous memoir called "against all hope." a cuban dictatorship were right wing rather than left wing, we would have won nobel peace prizest already. i said in the office about the objection to my colleagues that the left, if i may, so often sets the agenda, determines what we talk about, even if we disagree, people like us, here, disagree. they term what we talk about. there's a man named allen gross, and elliot knows plenty about him,
of ghandi and martin luther king. perfect. he's even black, but no one cares. che gavara is on a free t-shirt and no one knows who oscar basset is. che gavara and basset. he's someone that all too well the nobel peace prize. he could give it to the ladies in white. these people began they were wives and sisters and daughters and so one of political prisoners caught up in the so-called black springs. they are beaten severely for what they do. they hold a candlelight vigils and the like, and the state can't stand it and it makes things very difficult for them. let me quote still known by some of us as a cubin that once wrote a famous important memoir called "against all hope." he said if the dictatorship for right wing instead of left wing we would have won the nobel prize is already. it maybe so. i was saying the every day and the office to the objection of some of my colleagues that the left, if i may come so often sets the agenda. they determine what we talk about even if we disagree, people like us disagree. they determine what we talk about. and there was a man named alan gross and w
could. he's a follower of gandhi and martin luther king. he is just perfect. he is even black but no one cares. no one knows who oscar processes and they stand on opposite sides of the great divide shake a bar and ask her present. he is someone who ought to win the nobel priest price. he could give it to the ladies in white. their wives, sisters and daughters of political prisoners caught up in the so-called black spring. and wonderful group. they were beaten severely for what they did. they hold candlelight vigils and the like and the state just can't stand it. it makes things very difficult for them. marco valladares who is still known by some of us is the cuban solzhenitsyn. he said the cuban dictatorship were right-wing instead of left-wing we would have won to nobel prizes already. a quick point about cuba. i was saying the other day in the office to the objection of some of my colleagues, that the left if i may so often sets the agenda. they determine what we talked about. even if people like us disagree they determine what we talked about. elliott abrams knows plenty about him, he
from it? >> guest: just the same thing, just the same thing. i mean, i think what martin luther king said in the '60s that 11:00 on sunday morning is the most segregated hour in america still holds true and that we still need to--we can all stand to get to know each other a lot better. c-span: this is the book and the cover shows a--as we talked earlier, a photograph that no one knows where this picture was taken. it's everywhere, america. "walking on water," by randall kenan, our guest. thank you very much for joining us. >> guest: thank you for having me. a. >> to redesigneredesigned booknotes web site now features over 800 notable nonfiction authors interviewed about their books. there you can be all the programs, look at transcripts and use this searchable database to find links to the authors logged, facebook page and twitter feed. booknotes.org a helpful research tool and a great way to watch and enjoy the authors and their books. >> here's a look at some upcoming book fairs and festivals happening around the country. the 31st annual key west literary seminar is in florida from
book on martin luther king. .. there were two bills at national review and in the conservative movement, two bills. bill buckley concha a brilliant shooting star who lit up the sky and bill rusher, and never wavering northstar by which conservatives learned to chart their political course. now many have written about william f. buckley junior, ' irresistible renaissance man but no one until david frisk has given us an in-depth portrait of the other bill, william a. rusher among his other salutary -- played a pivotal role in the life of the national draft goldwater committee and that was critical, because if there had been no draft goldwater committee there would have been no presidential candidate barry goldwater in 1964. and if there had been no candidate goldwater in 1964, there would have been no president-elect ronald reagan in 1980. it was goldwater you see who approved reagan's famous a time for choosing television address which made reagan a political star overnight and led to his running for governor of california and eventually president of these united states. david recounts h
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)